Tag Archives: Science

Reforming My Driving Practices

This past summer, I took a long, hard look at my driving.  I realized that I wasn’t getting the fuel economy that I would have liked.

Over the course of having my 2013 Subaru Outback (i.e. since Dec 2012), I have kept records on every fill, miles and computed mpg.

The distribution is definitely bi-modal, but I’m working more to realize or enhance the upper end of this histogram.

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In particular, just since June 2014, I have been using the cruise control more, since I’ve noticed that it can maintain better fuel economy over short or long stints.

Here’s a similar histogram but just since I’ve reformed my driving.  Hoping to keep it up!

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How I Got Some Freshman Science Students To Read “The Economist”

Last week I was grappling with a way to teach the Washington State Science Standards, in particular the INQUIRY A piece.

As is often the case, inspiration came in the nick-of-time.  I would have my students

  1. gain an appreciation for the breadth of science
  2. practice some literacy skills
  3. generate some “scientific questions”
  4. work in groups
  5. practice some creativity

Here’s how it went.  The room is arranged in groups.  At the beginning of class, we review science as a pervasive quest for knowledge, which often looks like questions.  Define/Review scientific questions, and propose a form that students can use “How does ____ affect ____.”  (Is this Act 1 for Science, a la Dan Meyer?)

Tell students that there are pages from a magazine (suitably shuffled) on their group tables and that they are to get with partners and create a poster of 5 scientific questions which will be generated the following way.  Your partner takes a page and finds a noun on that page.  You take a different page and find a noun on that page.  You then come together and form a question “How does noun #1 affect noun #2.”  (Act 2, you have a tool/method, now apply it.)

Where this spins off into greatness is when students:

  • find themselves reading snippets of articles from the Economist for context, since they have been “struck in the curiousity bone
  • find themselves posing questions like “do bees affect cancer?” which might lead to a long and fruitful career in science for this 9th grader
  • realize that sometimes science questions look superficially quite silly but hide an incredible profundity, like “will dry ice slide down a sand dune?

Finally for Act 3, we have a wall full of questions, from 4 periods of science students, which we can now take to the next level of refinement of the question, and posing more questions.  Take a look:

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[Book Review] Where the Rubber Meets the Road

I’m reading a book by Richard N. Steinberg entitled An Inquiry Into Science Education, Where the Rubber Meets the Road.

Professor Steinberg took a sabbatical (2007-2008) from the City College of New York to teach high school physics in Harlem.  This book is a reflection on his experiences.

His themes are predictable if you’ve been following current topics in education.

  • teacher preparation
  • student apathy
  • classroom management
  • abysmal math fluency
  • standardized testing
  • teaching is a lot of work!

His more hopeful and helpful themes are around how he has stood for true inquiry in his science classrooms, and some lessons that he taught.  That plus some other references he cites as resources are worth the price of the book.

Steinberg spoke at a conference in Washington DC in May for the Robert Noyce Scholarship folks at PhysTEC, since he is also involved at that program at CCNY.  He doesn’t talk about PhysTEC in his book, but I suppose it would be out of context somewhat.

Tuesday, January 28, 1986, 8:39am PST, +75 Seconds

We weren’t too far into that morning’s Calculus lesson in Mr. Robinson’s class at Olympia High School when the PA interrupted to report that the Challenger had exploded shortly after launch.  I can remember looking up at the industrial clock next to the speaker in that classroom in Building 3;  I was incredulous.  Our teacher being visibly shaken—as were we all.  That was 25 years ago tomorrow.  RIP Challenger crew. 

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