Category Archives: E3 Exemplify an understanding of professional responsibilities and policies.

Need a Cross-Linked Standards Database, And Crowdsourced

The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) have a representation of the standards that is very technology friendly.  Which got me thinking…

On any given day, I’m writing a lesson that is touching on the following Standards:

In the business, a comprehensive analysis of how one standard compares to another is called a crosswalk.  But, that’s just another document you have to parse.  What you really need is the answer to this question:  “I’m focusing a lesson on XYZ standard, I wonder what other standards I’m potentially covering when I do that?

  • You want to find a related “standard”.  The word “standard” is in quotes because related concepts might not be called that, they might be called any of the following.

image

  • So let’s use a generic (thanks CCSS) term like statement.  You want to find related statements, which may start off as just a text search for common terms.
  • If search finds common terms the implication is that two statements are related, but you may want to walk the hierarchy of each statement
  • The hierarchy of statements is defined very carefully in a statements source document, i.e. “The PQR Standards”.

Here’s my implementation that would help solve this problem.

1. a relational database that contains the statements, all uniquely identifiable but also with their peculiar numberings, and tagged by what their source document was.

2. a table in the database that contains links between statements.  The link could also contain a rating for the link, e.g. “completely equivalent” to “keyword only”.  This table would be extensible and could grow very large over time.

The crowdsourcing comes in because I can’t as one person completely link CCSS (roughly 1500 “statements”) to NGSS (at least as large) and that would be just two of the many I listed above.  So I would put this database on the internet with links to appropriate forms and reports so that people could use it and add to it and refine the work of others.

Let me know if you think you would use such a tool.  Thanks!

SnapChat Leak: An Educational Opportunity?

If you’re following this story, then you know that SnapChat, a super-popular App that a large number of my high school freshmen have on their phones, had a security problem that allowed a hacker to get the usernames and phone numbers of 4.6 million SnapChat users.

[Was your data leaked?  You can check using this look-up tool.]

I was eager to see if any of my students were in the set of leaked accounts.  I wanted to create conversation around why data leakers do this, and what appropriate responses would have been for the users and creators of such technology.

So I did some poking around.  I downloaded the data (46MB ZIP).  I to open it as a CSV in Excel 2013, but it couldn’t.  I opened it in Notepad+ and searched for my number.  Not found.  I searched for anything in 425 area code (Bellevue-Redmond).  Nothing.  I searched for anything in 509 area code (eastern WA).  Nothing.  So none of my students were in the leaked data.

It turns out only a select few numbers in 76 area codes were shared.

https://i2.wp.com/www.snapchatdb.info/img/count.jpg

http://mashable.com/2014/01/01/tool-snapchat-compromised/

And it’s interesting that only 10,623 numbers in 206 area code (Seattle) were shared.  That’s only 1 part-per-thousand of the total numbers in 206.  Which is either a comment on the importance of SnapChat in Seattle or the underestimation of area codes to include from the hacker.

Or take a look at 815 area code in the picture above, if 215,953 numbers in 815 use SnapChat, that is 21 out of every thousand phones (or 2%)!  Not bad for a small App that doesn’t care about security.

So, can someone get me all the 509 numbers at SnapChat please?  It would help me in lessons at school next week.  Smile

Salary Comparisons, 2 Districts (Plus One In Progress), by Month

image

I am currently teaching in my 3rd School District, and I’ve been doing some analysis of my paystubs.  The solid lines above are gross salary amounts.

The order in which I taught is color-coded above, you have light blue (2011-2012), tan (2012-2013) and purple (2013-2014).  NOTE:  any purple numbers past 10/31 are estimates, not real data.

The broken lines are the base salary rates, which go up slightly and steadily each year based on seniority only.

Overall trends which I am just now noticing, but which others, who have been in teaching longer, know is:

1. Generally your gross (and net) decreases as the year goes on.  See trendline on net below.

2. Depending on other activities you engage in, or contract conditions, your gross can fluctuate by almost $500-$1000 a month.

3.  Net parallels gross pretty closely at a gap of about $1000-$1500. (see below)

image

How I Got Some Freshman Science Students To Read “The Economist”

Last week I was grappling with a way to teach the Washington State Science Standards, in particular the INQUIRY A piece.

As is often the case, inspiration came in the nick-of-time.  I would have my students

  1. gain an appreciation for the breadth of science
  2. practice some literacy skills
  3. generate some “scientific questions”
  4. work in groups
  5. practice some creativity

Here’s how it went.  The room is arranged in groups.  At the beginning of class, we review science as a pervasive quest for knowledge, which often looks like questions.  Define/Review scientific questions, and propose a form that students can use “How does ____ affect ____.”  (Is this Act 1 for Science, a la Dan Meyer?)

Tell students that there are pages from a magazine (suitably shuffled) on their group tables and that they are to get with partners and create a poster of 5 scientific questions which will be generated the following way.  Your partner takes a page and finds a noun on that page.  You take a different page and find a noun on that page.  You then come together and form a question “How does noun #1 affect noun #2.”  (Act 2, you have a tool/method, now apply it.)

Where this spins off into greatness is when students:

  • find themselves reading snippets of articles from the Economist for context, since they have been “struck in the curiousity bone
  • find themselves posing questions like “do bees affect cancer?” which might lead to a long and fruitful career in science for this 9th grader
  • realize that sometimes science questions look superficially quite silly but hide an incredible profundity, like “will dry ice slide down a sand dune?

Finally for Act 3, we have a wall full of questions, from 4 periods of science students, which we can now take to the next level of refinement of the question, and posing more questions.  Take a look:

IMG_1367

WAS Day 4

Washington Aerospace Scholars, July 17, 2013

Our day started with Mission Briefing, as usual. The teams are starting to get some urgency in their interactions, we don’t have a lot of time left. On this morning the Ethics Team is paid a significant compliment by their faculty consultant that they had a teleconference with, namely that their ideas/questions had a depth that was not often (ever?) seen by that consultant. (The consultant is a professor with space ethics experience at the University of Washington.) There was some confusion at the briefing related to issues that come from the structure of the projects which the teams are working on. Each team has a main topic and then can choose 2 subtopics from a list. When other teams don’t know which subtopics have been chosen, they are sometimes caught thinking that another team is covering a detail when in fact they are not. It seems like this could be a common problem in a project-based learning activity such as this, the solution of which would be to better align and inform participants about what to do when topics have *not* been selected. Completeness in covering one broad topic, but not going into depth on another subtopic seems to be a challenge for some of the scholars.

At 8:30a we met in a main auditorium at the MoF for a video conference call with NASA. Specifically, we were able to participate in a two-way audio, one-way video chat with Mission Control at Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas via a program called the Digital Learning Network. After a short introduction to some of the current space missions underway, e.g. the International Space Station (ISS) and the new Orion Spacecraft, we were able to pose questions to the Flight Director then on-duty in Mission Control. Our questions were pre-submitted but were then read live to the NASA folks who then answered them. The question and answer portion was carried live on NASA TV. Since I am a geek, I was able to bring up the NASA-TV feed on my phone and watch our session “live”, i.e. via NASA-TV and delayed about 1-2 minutes, instead of on the screen in our room. One of my favorite questions was “where is the International Space Station right now”, in answer to which the NASA folks turn around and look at the big map on the wall and give an answer.

It was a fairly non-routine call to Mission Control since just the day before, an astronaut on the ISS had experienced some water (coolant from his Personal Life Support System) collect in his helmet during a spacewalk. The Flight Director we spoke with described a higher level of excitement than usual during that event, which resulted in the safe return of the astronaut to the ship after an abort of the spacewalk. [Recall, if you are imagining a pool of water in the bottom of a facemask, that
in microgravity, water in the helmet is floating around, in either large or small blobs, getting in your eyes, nose and mouth, and you can’t reach up and into your helmet and do anything about it.  According to the report, the astronaut affected was willing
to continue the mission until another astronaut was able to come closer and look into the mask and recommend that Mission Control advise on an early termination of the spacewalk.  Much to be learned from situations like this and a timely reminder for scholars
in this program about the perils which still exist in space although it may seem routine.]

At 11:00am teams were to participate in the Design Review Board, which was mentors and assistant mentors and HQ giving feedback on Mission Project Work that each team had completed to date and also allowing them to get an overall feel of where all teams were on their projects. I did not attend that meeting, but hear from the Red Team Mentor that we were grilled on a few points, but were not the team most grilled.

Time is short, but to put that in perspective, teams have limited time to complete their presentations. Presentation drafts are due on Thursday (tomorrow) and they will be presenting them at the luncheon on Friday.

In the afternoon we went to the University of Washington to hear from Jim Hermanson at the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and tour some research labs. All teams visited the Nonlinear Dynamics and Control Lab (101 AERB), the RAM (ramjet lab) and the ESS Plasma Lab (Johnson 275A).

[I would like to type comments here on how I think the visits to the lab went, but let me do that later.]

After the lab visits we had the Rover Request for Proposals (RFP) presentations in Johnson Hall 111. Each team presented their thinking for the design of a new rover and based on the quality and depth of information in their proposal they were awarded money for their team’s account. Red Team made a good impression on the 3 faculty/graduate research folks on the panel and came away with a total of $50 million for our team’s account. I must say here that HQ had warned us that we were not to produce carbon copies of the Curiosity Rover (currently on Mars) for this presentation and I think all teams more or less heeded that warning.

After dinner in McMahon hall, we took our schoolbus back to the MoF for our evening activities.

The staff of HQ, and other SR-AFs here this week had been saying all week that the “Payload Lofting” engineering challenge was the most fun to watch. Based on student responses to the activity it also appeared to be fun to participate in. Here’s the setup: a fishing line is attached to a second-story balcony and railing and the other end is on the ground. Students are asked to use balloons to move the unassembled parts of their “rocket” (another engineering challenge) from the ground below to the balcony which signifies Low Earth Orbit (LEO). Various monies are charged/credited to the teams for multiple balloons that they use, for successfully being the first team to get a part lofted, for being the first team to lift all their parts successfully, and for leaving any parts on the ground at the end of the activity. The results of our lofting exercise have not been published yet, but Red Team was the first to loft a part successfully and the third team to complete the lofting of all their parts.

The next challenge we completed or prepared to complete was the rocket-building and egg drop (lander) activities. Our team had designed both of those together, but it now fell to half of the team (we were split up) to construct the design for the rocket and the lander simultaneously. I stayed with the lander team, and I’m happy to say that we were able to successfully get our egg to the ground from a third-story railing. However, we were not able to land our egg within the safe target and so only collected another $40 million (I think, let me double-check).

Once again, a bunch of tired—but invigorated—students and staff returned to the hotel to tell a few stories from the day and turn in.

PS: I asked someone from HQ how hard it was to design the tasks so that an appropriate level of difficulty was achieved. In the payload lofting scenario, you would be surprised how high you can get parts of various weights on fishing line and a standard drinking straw with a 6-9-12 inch balloon. As far as the egg drop is concerned, eggs are much tougher than you think, and our team’s design while not flashy did get the job done. Again the implications for the educator and the classroom are: the projects teach so much in the way of problem solving and team work, you have to do them, and iterate as needed, and students will be engaged the whole way. What I take away is that doing something, anything in the real world will always lead to complexity sufficient enough to illuminate or demonstrate physical law. So get busy!

WAS Day 3

Washington Aerospace Scholars, Summer Residency, Tuesday, July 16, 2013

After typing this report on Tuesday morning for Monday, I went and found our System Manager and gave her some feedback over breakfast. I think that was an effective move, but it was made possible or necessary due to reflections on the prior day and where we needed to go for the day ahead. I am reminded that daily or regular reflection on my teaching can have the same effect, namely taking stock in what has gone well or what could go better, helps make future outcomes better.

We started the day at the MoF in our Mission Briefing. Each team got up and gave a status of where their team was in the performing of various tasks. I think our session went well except for one of our team members who contradicted or sought to clarify our status. I will talk to that team member offline about how unprofessional that looks, since they should have clarified their status internally before going before the other teams and showing that our team had some internal disconnect. I’m proud of my team having concise status, being mostly on the same page, and being able to communicate what they might need from other teams, e.g. red flags or warnings about where they might be blocked or need further clarification. Status meetings are valuable things despite the general revulsion (anecdotal? See Dilbert cartoon.) that people have for meetings in general. I found some of my memories from my former life at Microsoft flowing back about how teams posture and sometimes put up smoke screens about progress that is communicated more glowingly than it actually is. How could status meetings be used in an educational context? The answer is fairly straightforward if students are working on a clearly defined project with dated deliverables and interdependencies with other teams that they need to resolve. However, how could they be used in a classroom that isn’t doing projects? Is there a way to couch a quarter or semester of learning goals as a project that students need to make progress on, and give them tools for measuring their progress, reporting on that progress and taking corrective action for lackluster results? I think the answer might be standards-based grading, and I think it is something to try which will serve students well in a variety of future careers. I don’t think students are naturally project-oriented, or team-status aware, but I think all can improve on those basic job skills.

Over lunch we spoke with a Geologist on MSL, the Mars Science Laboratory mission that is supporting the Curiosity Rover on Mars. We did so over a Google hangout with video and audio. The video and audio quality were good, but it very hard to see what was on the screen, and I sat closer than any scholar. From a tech standpoint, there must be a way to share desktop or documents in higher fidelity, or there might have been a way to get scholars closer to the screen so they could engage better. (I think I will ask some of my students today for some feedback on that session, to see if they noticed this same thing that I did.) As a footnote to my comment yesterday about the usefulness of bringing experts into the classroom, today was proof that you can bring those experts in virtual ways (video, audio) and still get good engagement or deliver good content to students.

Red Team had a phone conference call with a researcher working on fusion drive at the University of Washington today which went very well. I’m told that students even pointed out some ideas that researchers had not considered, which is always exhilarating. I didn’t attend the conference call as a way to support other scholars who weren’t involved in that topic (Propulsion). Here again I was reminded of some management learnings that I have gained from my prior experience. Namely, as a manager/leader it is not leadership to spend time with those workers that are highly motivated and have the same learning style as you. It is more effective leadership to speak with your whole team, i.e. apportion your time more equitably so that all your team knows that you are supportive and eager for them to succeed. For example, in our preparation for our second Peer Presentation, I realized that I didn’t really have a good grasp on the Reflectance Spectrometers that we were supposed to be presenting. Furthermore, I realized that the scholar on our team also didn’t have a good idea of what they wanted students to take away from her part of the presentation on those devices either. I realized that this was a coaching opportunity and a teachable moment. Both teachers and presenters need to know what the main goal of their presentation as information transfer needs to be. When I was able to coach my scholar on some presentation tips, they were more confident, the material was relayed better, and the overall presentation went much better. A comment from HQ was “I have not seen Reflectance Spectrometers presented as clearly as Red Team just did.” Nice work! Overall, we got $40 million bonus for a 9.3 score (out of 10) on our presentation. That goes a little way towards reducing the pain we feel from getting -$20 million on our first presentation.

We took a grand tour of Boeing’s assembly facility at Paine Field in Everett. I realized that what we were seeing on the tour were mostly skilled (highly skilled!) labor jobs, and not really day-to-day STEM jobs at Boeing when we tour that facility. I’m not so sure that students connected these massive machines with the pile of STEM work that goes into producing each one. Do I want to buy stock in Boeing based on their production estimates? Yes. Do I want to ride in a 787 Dreamliner? Most definitely! Do I know what the engineers do tucked away around those assembly lines all day? Not so much… Oh and one more question that is teasing me: does the production of airplanes with a high proportion of carbon fiber do a net sequester of carbon and thus help reduce greenhouse gases? I know the plane is green, but how green?

After the Boeing tour we spent some time at the MoF Restoration Center where aircraft are refurbished or stored when they are not at the Museum of Flight gallery. After seeing the massive amount of spare parts and tools and high-tech tools used on modern planes it was a little depressing to see the mostly volunteer, somewhat duck tape and baling wire operation that restoration is. However, I can appreciate the value of working on historical airplanes both as mechanical and engineering history, and as a “maker” type activity for students. I just didn’t find a lot of interpretive information at the Restoration Center. Not to belittle the volunteers who are contributing mightily to the preservation of our aeronautical heritage in any way!

As mentioned above, upon our return to MoF we had a successful Peer Presentation on Spectrometers. The team was very supportive of each other and wanted them to succeed. I should mention here that we timed our presentation and had scenarios we would do if we were over or under time. When we were under time, our presenter had a few questions prepared to ask the audience, and he did so, but somewhat humorously cut off the reply from the student answering the question to stay on our time, which he did, and our final time was 7:07.

I should note that Scholars are starting to show signs of being tired. Quite a few took a nap on the traffic-slowed return from Everett to Boeing Field. We ended our work on Tuesday with a Lego Mindstorm Rover development project. I was interested to see that almost every student was engaged in that project in task, with the usual type-A’s driving key tasks and the other other scholars taking supporting roles. The hands-on power of these projects cannot be underestimated. Students had to reason about gear reductions, and power limitations of small motors, of the flex and unexpected behaviors of lego structures, and how to program and test robot code. I can’t help but think that this type of work can only hone student’s intuition and experience which can enlighten their classroom learning. We need to more robotics, more maker-faires, more hands on if we expect future STEM professionals to be able to innovate and create. The time-pressure frustrated some, and invigorated others, the team still lacked some integration of efforts, but I think even that aspect of team work is best learned and honed through more of these activities. I am eager to do more hands-on, project-based, and team-oriented activities in my class room, because like the students, I will only get better with practice.

WAS Day 2

Washington Aerospace Scholars Day 2, Monday July 15, 2013

One other student and I found ourselves first down to breakfast at 6:10am. Breakfast is a buffet. I asked a couple of students what they liked most about the simulation from Tuesday. Both said that the tasks in themselves weren’t difficult, but that they felt the pressure not to let down the team, or their mission partners. That’s good motivation to harness for the classroom, but what is the team in a school environment? Scholars here have the benefit of being relatively unknown to each other and thus perhaps not willing to let the others see weakness or lack of motivation or (gasp) ignorance. Compare that with a classroom of students that are probably well-acquainted with each other, and who, instead of rising to an occasion, might tend to sabotage a similar simulation or do less than their best work.

My team’s main focus on this day was to select some key roles for 2-3 scholars to play on the team for the rest of the week. Scholars had submitted résumés to me and I had forwarded to our mentor (a Boeing Engineer). It was the mentor’s responsibility to pick the scholars for these team roles via interviews with scholars that had expressed interest in those roles. I’ll note here that group dynamics had started in full on this day. The students who normally assume leadership roles and postures in the group had done so, the students who might generally be characterized as passive in a groups had also slid into those roles. Those are natural consequences of any work environment, and any task that invigorates some and not others. [Later that evening I would confront a couple of those students that seemed disinterested or not engaged that day. 
One scholar said that they were off that day, probably tired.]

After the roles for our team were selected: (following from SR-AF Summer Residency Handbook)

“System Manager: coordinates subsystems; understands all project sub-topics; represents team at briefings.”

“Point of Contact: communicates with HQ and other teams.”

The team organized itself around the work/deliverables that were to be completed that day. Our mentor has given us some nudges in some good directions, and is creating an ethic on the team that “Red Team is Prepared”. I would say esprit de corps is high during the morning work session. “Red Team will help the other teams make good decisions. Red Team will poke holes in other teams’ plans. Etc.”

It is in that spirit that we went into our preparations for the peer presentations. Red Team went first. Although I had done a run-through with the rest of the team, and we were coming up short on time, I did not push the team to really nail content and technical depth. Thus, later in the day, when our score was given, we were fined $20 million for a presentation that was “the shortest and least developed of any presentation [she] had seen” according to HQ. Red Team was thus taken down a notch. It will be interesting to see how the team reacts to the setback, and who leads that charge. I can cheerlead, and I have an idea of who might bring us back. (Hint: our SM is charismatic…)

Over lunch we had an excellent talk from an Aerojet (Redmond) Engineer who has worked on rockets since 1997. Aerojet has provided rocket motors for many NASA missions for the past 30 or so years. The talk was engaging, the questions were relevant to the mission projects which all teams were working on (and especially Red Team’s), and I know I wished we could have heard more. My takeaway for the classroom is that students can sense when they are in the presence of a subject matter expert. How can I get similar people into my classroom with content that is engaging and a delivery that is also interesting. I can do some thinking on that now, during the summer.

After lunch we had some time to ourselves in the Museum of Flight and in particular, Red Team had a turn to tour the new Full Fuselage Trainer, which is a scale mockup of a space shuttle cockpit and cargo bay. [NOTE: 
I am way too tall to be of very much use in that cramped cockpit, interestingly enough.]

During our dinner back in our team briefing room at the Museum of Flight, we had a presentation from a representative from the College Success Foundation, talking in particular about the Washington Opportunity Scholarship. It was interesting to hear some students scoff when they heard that the qualifying gpa was *only* 2.75, and the household income cutoff was 125% of the median household income in Washington which was $142,000. [need to check those figures again…] To be fair these students at WAS might not stay in state (did I hear scoffing at the UW?) and might not need another $1000 their first two years, and $5000 in their last three years in college. In other words they have access to other streams of financial aid, or their parents will cough up some larger percentage of their calculated contributions. But, I was encouraged by the talk for my students that are underrepresented in STEM and Medical fields, and got the presenter’s card and will make sure that I put up posters in my room and hall to make students aware.

Our day ended with the beginning of two of the Engineering Challenges that we will be involved with this week. The first was to design a rocket. The rules of the Challenge are that we need to meet an objective, with limited resources, and with limited time. The first challenge is to launch a rocket, and the second challenge is to protect an egg during a drop from some height onto some smooth or “interesting” terrain. I was not really surprised that only a few students out of the 10 on Red Team had had experience in related tasks in their schooling or hobby pursuits. I tried to interject a bit of my understanding on the tasks, but mostly I questioned certain design decisions, and tried to make sure everyone was at the table. [There are, in all, probably four scholars out of ten that get a little overwhelmed in these group activities and show their withdrawal from the task through not saying anything or even sitting away from the table, while the others stand at the table
and sketch or demonstrate with their hands what their ideas are.] I should probably say something about this today urging students to try a different role than what they naturally choose—goes for both the talkative and the taciturn, and to remind them that we are a team and need everyone’s expertise, and warn them that the engineers that don’t speak up when they know a decision is being made that is bad are tantamount to those engineers that let shuttles fly with brittle O-rings, or attempt to land with damaged heat tiles. That’s coming down a little hard, but that, as well, is a stretch for me and what my role might be.

Our last Engineering Challenge of the night was designing the lander (egg drop) from a cup, a plastic bag, and some cushioning material. It is interesting to take a simple “dissipate some kinetic energy” problem from physics and hear how students imagine that this is best done. None would argue that a parachute creates a significant amount of drag and thus dissipates a majority of the energy an egg must survive in a free fall. But how to bring the rest of the problem home. I think in a future science class I could have a lot of good discussion about hypotheses that students might make about the energy dissipation properties of various materials, and testing those hypotheses before we commit to a design. I’m fine with the time pressure that we are under here as a simulation of the engineering and in particular space engineering environment, but I’m thinking a more methodical approach would help students of various abilities.

The final two peer presentations of the day were by other teams, and it was the announcing of their scores that brought about Red Teams funk. But we can own our past presentations and make sure that our next ones are better. [Excuses:  It is hard for a team to go first. 
It is hard for a team without an assistant mentor and with a new SR-AF to make a solid performance if they go first.]

Back at the hotel another SR-AF and I took some 17 students to Taco Bell (was closed at 10pm!) so we went to Jack-In-The-Box. The students were well-behaved and enjoyed a chance to satisfy their munchies. I was in bed by midnight, and am dragging a little this morning when I was up at 5:30am, and have typed this from 6:15am to 7:05am.

National Center for Teacher Quality–2013 Teacher Preparation Programs Report

The National Center for Teacher Quality (NCTQ) released a report June 2013 rating teacher preparation programs across the US. 

Here are the schools it graded for Washington State.  But first, the caveat:

image

image

Oh and here’s the key to the abbreviations.

image

No, Seattle Pacific University isn’t in the document anywhere, nor is the University of Puget Sound, nor Pacific Lutheran University.  I did take a look at Northwest University.  I probably should have taken a little bit closer look…or even WSU.

I will take a closer look at the rubric they used to grade those programs and try to come up with something for SPU, stay tuned for that.

But, since I just finished my first year of teaching, a few quotes and figures from the report resonated with me.

Should first-year teaching be the equivalent of fraternity hazing, an inevitable rite of passage? Is there no substitute for “on-the-job” training of novice teachers? The answers are obvious. We need more effective teacher preparation. Our profound belief that new teachers and our children deserve better from America’s preparation programs is the touchstone of this project. (pg. 4)

I had a hunch going in that first-year student achievement wouldn’t be great.  I just didn’t have the tricks, the lesson planning experience, and the command of the specific syllabus material that would have held a candle to my more experienced colleagues.  I shudder to think of the damage I might have done.

image

What was and is true is that I wanted to have impact on kids, to help them love STEM more.  I wanted to believe that they all could achieve higher levels, I went via the most expedient route to get credentialed to be able to teach.  That would seem to indicate the truth of the next diagram that the people who wind up in front of students really want to be there, and if they succeed it doesn’t really matter how they got there.  They “had what it takes”.

image

But what if, what if my training had prepared me better for kids of low SES or high ELL?  And what if my training had top flight (in this state) preparation for math and science?  There’s a study which claims I might have had more impact…

image

The next one makes logical sense, the new guy/gal gets the hard assignments.  In a way, that’s how all jobs start, right?  If you gave first year teachers the easy jobs, how would they ever feel the urgency to perfect their craft over the range of student ability and teaching responsibilities?

image

One conclusion I draw is that my preparation was probably pretty typical, and that my first year experience was pretty typical.  If I respond typically, I suppose I could expect more of the same.  The question is, how do I create an atypical 2nd year, or even an extraordinary one?

Washington State School Employee Salaries 2009-2010

There are two web sites which claim to have school district employee salaries for the 2009-2010 school year.  Since I used to a be a paperboy (I think I made about $100/month) delivering The Olympian, I tried this one first.

http://www.theolympian.com/stateteachersalary/

image

The other web site is the Tacoma News Tribune (TNT), which is a little more powerful in that it could list the top employees for the whole state:

http://wwwb.thenewstribune.com/databases/school_pay/index.php?names=&schools=&districts=&sort=salary_annual&job_title=

Using the TNT website, here’s the top 5 educators in the state by salary

image

So remember, if you are planning to be a public school teacher, you are a public servant, and your salary can become common knowledge.

What are some constructive/productive uses of this information?

Internship Reflection Week of 2012-01-16 [21] (Snow Week)

January 16th was Martin Luther King Jr. Day, and I took my daughter to Microsoft, where they regulary have a celebration of Dr. King and his accomplishments.  The guest speaker was Spike Lee, who reminded us to not just pay lip-service to Dr. King, but to review his speeches and writings.  Finally Spike told us to remember reading and how important education is.  The Director of Community Affairs for Microsoft, Andrea Taylor, took up the theme about education and called it the civil rights issue of our era.

On January 17th the snow storm hit, and Highline was operating 2 hours late, while Federal Way was called on account of snow.  I stayed home for a while, hoping to drive in for the Professional Development meeting at 2pm.  However, that meeting was moved up to 1pm so I missed it.  I also learned that that you are not allowed to take a sick day on the first work day following a scheduled vacation day.  I had no idea about this rule, but I surmise it was put into place to avoid absenteeism and abuse of sick time.  I thus had to take one of my precious personal days of which I only get a few per contract.  Need to make sure this doesn’t happen again.

On January 18th and 19th and 20th* both Federal Way and Highline had no school, so we had a leisurely day at home on the 19th, that is, until our power went out.  We spent the next two nights at two different hotels which was fun.  We also took the opportunity to visit with family in Olympia, Benjamin got to go sledding, and we ran up to Bellevue to get the generator for my mom and sister.

Thankfully, power came back for us on Friday, but we were back in our home by Saturday.  School resumed the next week.

* Highline had an In-Service day on 1/20, so there was effective no school this whole week except for a 2-hour delay on 1/17.

%d bloggers like this: