7th Grade POGIL-Based Mathematics Lessons

I wanted to start a blog post where I could demonstrate some POGIL-based lessons that I have been generating.  POGIL is short for “Process-Oriented Guided-Inquiry Learning”, and I might describe it as:

  • students work in groups, where roles are defined
  • students work through material that has inquiry as its goal or major method
  • teacher acts as supporter, clarifier and coach, but not as answer-giver or lecturer

So here some links, in a table, and what I learned/observed from presenting them.

Lesson Title and Link Date First Delivered Observations
Percent Review 11/07/2011 Was hoping to get at the difference between amount of discount and discounted price.  I feel based on a quiz given that students were clear on that point.

The lesson also covered some simple conversions between percents, decimals and fractions, as well as the notion of converting words in a sentence to symbols in a “math sentence”, e.g. “50% of 100 is what” can be written as “.5 * 100 = ?”

Graphs Review 11/14/2011 This one took two class periods, but I feel that students were much better at computing slope afterwards.  Need a summative assessment to be sure, however.
Area and Volume Review [not yet]  
     
     
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Comments

  • Aisha Mahmood  On August 4, 2012 at 2:29 am

    Very good Effort. I want to know whether we can use POGIL based mathematics to know the variation in Mathematical thinking and learning of different ethnic groups. If yes, can i use your developed lessons for my data collection.

    • John Weisenfeld  On August 7, 2012 at 8:44 pm

      Aisha, send me some e-mail, and will I ask some other folks that do POGIL-based math instruction. You are welcome to use my lessons, if you find them helpful. I have not used them to measure variations in mathematical thinking and learning in different ethnic groups.

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