The DOE 2011 “Investing in Innovation (i3)” Finalists, 4 Have STEM Focus.

I don’t know if you’ve been following “investing in innovation” grant applicants or process.  Here’s a quick rundown.

This year’s competition required applicants to submit proposals focused on one of 5 absolute priorities, including two new priorities aimed at promoting science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education and increasing achievement and high school graduation rates in rural schools.

To learn more about i3’s potential 2011 grantees visit: http://www2.ed.gov/programs/innovation/index.html

I go there download this Excel

Detailed list of the 2011 Highest-Rated i3 Applicants
The list of highest-rated applicants is organized by grant type (i.e., Scale-Up, Validation, and Development) and then by Absolute Priority within grant type. The list is not organized by rank order. clip_image001 MS Excel

Filter by applicants listing STEM as Priority.

i3 2011 Highest-Rated Applications

#

Competition

Absolute Priority (AP)

Applicant Name

Project Title

Applicant City

Applicant State

Applicant Type

Students Served (Est.)

Funding Requested

Score

Abstract

1

Scale up

AP2: STEM

Old Dominion University Research Foundation

Technology-facilitated Scale Up of Proven Model of Math Instruction in High Need Schools

Norfolk

VA

Nonprofit w/ consortium

135,000

$24,995,690

86.33

Link

3

Validation

AP2: STEM

National Math and Science Initiative

Partnership to Increase Student Achievement and College Readiness
in STEM Education

Dallas

TX

Nonprofit w/ consortium

90,900

$14,996,367

96.17

Link

10

Development

AP2: STEM

New York City Board of Education

InnovateNYC

New York

NY

LEA

10,000

$2,959,100

99.00

Link

11

Development

AP2: STEM

New York Hall of Science

SciGames: A Technology-enhanced Model for Bridging Informal and Formal Science Learning

Queens

NY

Nonprofit w/LEA

2,000

$2,995,642

98.50

Link

I then click each of those links (far right) to see abstracts of each application.  My comments in the column on the right.

 

Technology-facilitated Scale Up of Proven Model of Math Instruction in High Need Schools

Old Dominion University Research Foundation

Norfolk, VIRGINIA

Indicated Organization Type

Nonprofit w/ consortium of schools

Indicated Grant Type

Scale-up

Private Match Waiver Requested

No

Award Length Requested

5 Years

Federal Funding Requested

$24,995,690.00

Absolute Priority Area

AP2: Promoting Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education

Competitive Preference Priority Areas

CPP8: Unique Learning Needs, CPP10: Technology

Project Description

The project will provide students in high need middle school with increased access to rigorous and engaging coursework in STEM via scaled-up implementation of a proven cooperative learning model in mathematics instruction, STAD-Math. This project also structures an innovative, high-quality, multi-tiered approach to professional development that employs school based math coaching, an on-line platform, and teacher-made videos of their own practices in a multi-tiered community of learners design. The use of technology will play a key role in enabling professional development to be provided in rural and urban areas in a highly cost-effective way. Expected outcomes are statistically significant improvements in math achievement among students in STAD-Math classrooms relative to controls by the third year of implementation, including closing achievement gaps for limited English proficient students, and students with disabilities. The project will serve 135,000 students in 185 high need middle schools across the U.S. over 5 years. Official partners include Old Dominion University, Norfolk Public Schools, Halifax County (VA) Public Schools, Judd (TX) ISD, United School District 428 (KS), Johns Hopkins University, and the Success for All Foundation.

This is the largest grant which is still alive in the competition. It is also the grant which claims to be able to serve the largest number of students.

This application seems to hinge on something called STAD-Math which I believe stands for “ Student Teams Achievement Division (STAD) instruction, a type of cooperative learning strategy”

Need to do more research on STAD-Math

The National Math and Science Initiative’s Partnership to Increase Student Achievement and College-Readiness in STEM Education

National Math and Science Initiative

Dallas, TEXAS

Indicated Organization Type

Nonprofit w/ LEA

Indicated Grant Type

Validation

Private Match Waiver Requested

No

Award Length Requested

5 Years

Federal Funding Requested

$14,996,367.00

Absolute Priority Area

AP2: Promoting Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education

Competitive Preference Priority Areas

CPP7: College Access and Success, CPP9: Productivity

Project Description

The National Math and Science Initiative (NMSI) seeks an i3 Validation Grant to scale and replicate the successful Advanced Placement Training and Incentive Program (APTIP) to reach approximately 90,900 students in 40 school districts in Colorado and Indiana. APTIP improves student achievement, especially for high-need students and those traditionally underrepresented in STEM subjects, by significantly enhancing the high school curriculum and increasing the number and diversity of students taking College Board Advanced Placement (AP) courses and passing
AP exams in math, science, and English. The proposal’s objective is to increase the number of students scoring 3 or higher on (passing) AP exams in math, science, and English in order to increase student achievement and collegereadiness in STEM subjects. APTIP accomplishes this objective by: making rigorous STEM courses more accessible to high-need students and those traditionally underrepresented in STEM; establishing an expectation that these students can succeed at that level; and supporting students and teachers who aim for those high standards. Independent research confirms, based on past APTIP replication, that expected outcomes of APTIP are: ( 1) significantly increased numbers and diversity of students taking and passing AP math, science, and English exams, including high-need students and those traditionally underrepresented in STEM and (2) increased college enrollment and persistence, especially for high-need students and those traditionally underrepresented in STEM.
NMSI’s proposal, The National Math & Science Initiative’s Partnership to Increase Student Achievement and College-Readiness in STEM Education, addresses Absolute Priority 2: Promoting STEM Education, and Competitive Preference Priorities 7 (Supporting College Access and Success) and 9 (Improving Productivity). Additional Official Partners are the Colorado Legacy Foundation, The University ofNotre Dame, the American Institutes for Research, and the 40 LEAs listed in Appendix A.

This application hinges on AP tests as a metric and means for getting more students into STEM fields.

InnovateNYC

New York City Board of Education

New York, NEW YORK

Indicated Organization Type

LEA

Indicated Grant Type

Development

Private Match Waiver Requested

No

Award Length Requested

3 Years

Federal Funding Requested

$2,959,100.00

Absolute Priority Area

AP2: Promoting Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education

Competitive Preference Priority Areas

CPP7: College Access and Success, CPP10: Technology

Project Description

The lack of innovation in education is not due to a lack of creativity, but the misalignment of student and educator need to market supply of innovations. The New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE) seeks funding to develop and evaluate its InnovateNYC Education Innovation Ecosystema network of NYC schools, partner districts, solutions developers, and investors who coordinate their needs, solutions, and resources to better align innovative solutions (existing and yet developed) to the learning challenges impeding student achievement. Through InnovateNYC, the NYCDOE will better articulate student and educator need, provide clear metrics for how solutions will be evaluated, and recruit partner schools to co-design and pilot promising solutions. In doing so, we will leverage the size and diversity of our school system to assess and aggregate true demand for innovations, package compelling incentives for investment in specific solutions, and direct the market to generate innovations that address specific student learning challenges in STEM education.
Partners: College Board identify critical STEM learning challenges using NAEP 4-8 grade math and science results; Ashoka Changemakers, STARTL, EdTech Entrepreneurs Lab publish learning challenges to community of developers and solicit solutions; NY Hall of Science, IDEO evaluate and select submissions that merit piloting; Research Alliance for NYC Schools, Center on Reinventing Public Education evaluate and assess solution and ecosystem Academic Return on Investment (AROI). Funders provide incentive grants for development, testing and evaluation. NYCDOE pre-commit to purchase licenses to high AROI solutions.

I find this project description virtually unintelligible.

SciGames: A Technology-enhanced Model for Bridging Informal and Formal Science Learning

New York Hall of Science

Queens, NEW YORK

Indicated Organization Type

Nonprofit w/ LEA

Indicated Grant Type

Development

Private Match Waiver Requested

No

Award Length Requested

5 Years

Federal Funding Requested

$2,995,642.00

Absolute Priority Area

AP2: Promoting Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education

Competitive Preference Priority Areas

CPP10: Technology

Project Description

The New York Hall of Science proposes an Investing in Innovation development grant to address Absolute Priority 2Promoting STEM Education. We focus on the goal of increasing the number of individuals from groups traditionally underrepresented in STEM, including minorities, providing them with access to rigorous and engaging coursework in STEM that will prepare them for college and/or careers in STEM. We aim to do this by developing, implementing, and evaluating a new system of technologies (Competitive Preference Priority 10), SciGames, designed to bridge formal classroom and informal playground science learning environments. Research tells us that informal science environments low stakes quality can have a positive impact on students science affect, but are much less effective for science learning than inquiry-based classroom instruction, which, however, has been shown to have limited positive impact on these students affect. We draw from recent studies on guided play and gaming to hypothesize that an informal game with science intrinsically integrated into the gameplay paired with formal classroom inquiry could support student improvement in both affect and learning, both being necessary to enter the pipeline to STEM careers. We propose to develop and test SciGames, a suite of technologies that turns students playground play into a game. The game requires students to learn and use target physics concepts and the technology logs physics data during students playground gameplay. Student data is incoporated into a digital app, which is designed to support deeper inquiry into the core science concepts back in the classroom. We will develop and test three SciGames that address three core 8th grade physics concepts about force and motion. We will conduct an Implementation study in Years 1 and 2 with 2,000 New York City students from groups underrepresented and their 30 teachers. In Years 3 and 4, we will conduct an impact study with 6,000 students and 80 teachers.

This application hinges on the use of games for science learning.

From: U.S. Department of Education [mailto:ed.gov@public.govdelivery.com]
Sent: Thursday, November 10, 2011 6:52 AM
To: Weisenfeld, John
Subject: Twenty-three i3 Applicants Named as 2011 Grantees Pending Private Match

News from the Department of EducationHaving trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page.

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Twenty-three Investing in Innovation Applicants Named as 2011 Grantees Pending Private Match

The U.S. Department of Education announced today 23 highest-rated Investing in Innovation (i3) applicants as potential grantees for the 2011 grant fund of the $150 million. The finalists, selected from nearly 600 applicants, must now secure matching private matching funds equivalent to at least 5% of Scale-up, 10% of Validation, or 15% of Development awards by December 9, 2011, in order to receive their grant.

“Investing in these vital innovations across the country has the potential to dramatically enhance learning and accelerate student performance and to do so cost-effectively” said U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. “This round of i3 grantees is poised to have real impact in areas of critical need including STEM education and rural communities, on projects ranging from early childhood interventions to school turnaround models that will prepare more students for college and career.”

This year’s competition required applicants to submit proposals focused on one of 5 absolute priorities, including two new priorities aimed at promoting science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education and increasing achievement and high school graduation rates in rural schools. The remaining three priorities focused on supporting effective teachers and principals, implementing high standards and high-quality assessments, and turning around persistently low-performing schools.

Competitive preference was also given to applicants that demonstrated support for improving early learning outcomes, increasing college access and success, addressing the unique needs of students with disabilities and limited English proficient students, or improving productivity or technology.

“With just 25% of the funding available in round one, i3’s 2011 competition attracted hundreds of innovators from schools, districts and non-profits across the country, addressing many of the most persistent challenges in education,” said Jim Shelton, assistant deputy secretary for the Office of Innovation and Improvement. “In just a few short years, i3 has the potential to provide educators with a rich catalogue of practical solutions that they can confidently use to help advance student achievement at every level – not just increase proficiency.”

This year’s applicants included school districts, groups of districts, and nonprofits in partnership with districts or a consortium of schools, competing for funding in one of the program’s three grant levels.

“Scale-up” grants of up to $25 million to support innovation projects with the strongest evidence and track records of success; “Validation” grants of up to $15 million to fund innovations with proven effectiveness supported by moderate levels of evidence; and, “Development” grants of up to $3 million to support promising but relatively untested innovation projects with high potential for positive impact.

The 23 highest-rated applicants include 1 Scale-up, 5 Validation and 17 Development.

Despite reduced funding, the Department anticipates awarding nearly half as many grants in 2011 as the 49 awarded in 2010, given extensive representation of “Development” projects among the highest-rated applications. Awards will be made in mid to late December.

The President’s fiscal year 2012 budget proposes continued funding education innovation with a request for $300 million to support a third round of i3 grants.

A complete list of the 2011 highest-rated applicants follows.

Aspire Public Schools
Baltimore City Public Schools
Berea College
Boston Public Schools
The College Board
Del Norte Unified School District
Fresno County Office of Education
Kentucky Valley Educational Cooperative
KnowledgeWorks
The Metropolitan Education Commission
National Math and Science Initiative
New York City Board of Education
New York Hall of Science
New Visions For Public Schools, Inc
North Carolina New Schools Project
Oakland Unified School District
Old Dominion University Research Foundation
Ounce of Prevention Fund
Success for All Foundation
Temple University
Texas Tech University
University of Minnesota
University of Alaska Statewide Office of K-12 Outreach

To learn more about i3’s potential 2011 grantees visit: http://www2.ed.gov/programs/innovation/index.html.


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