Borich Chapter 3, (reading Reflection #3, due 7/28)

The main sections of this chapter are:

  • Goals, Standards and Objectives
  • Steps in Preparing Behavioral Objectives
  • The Cognitive, Affective and Psychomotor Domains
  • Some Misunderstandings about Objectives
  • The Cultural Roots of Objectives

As I read about setting objectives, I think I could definitely use some more practice.  So let me experiment with a topic which I think is key to students in physics, the skill of drawing a Free-Body-Diagram.  There are numerous web resources about applying this skill, and it is essentially to solving almost any problem in classical dynamics in physics.  And it can be fun!

http://www.ehow.com/how_5193988_draw-body-diagram-physics.html

http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/newtlaws/U2L2c.cfm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_body_diagram

And here are some objectives I could write from a lesson plan around kinetics/kinematics.

Students will be able to attack inclined plane problems by drawing a free body diagram which will enable them to write Newton’s second law in vector form, solving for forces or accelerations in the problem.

That’s good for a first start, but any body can be cut free and random forces applied and you can get a vector equation.  The real trick comes in resolving the forces into simplest representations due to physical constraints, or assuming such constraints if they are not given so that a problem becomes more tractable.  Maybe I should go back one step.

Students will be able to convert a word problem into a drawing which accurately represents the situation described.

Students will be then able to draw a free-body-diagram  appropriate to the situation described and label it with forces that they will use to solve the problem.

Students will be able to solve simple word problems, using F=ma and by drawing and labeling an appropriate free-body-diagram for the problem.

Now I can evaluate these objectives according to instructions in (Borich, 2011).  Will I be able to assess these objectives in formative and summative ways?  Will I be able to assess them in a graduated way, i.e. the proficiency level of met, exceeded, not met?  Will I be able to rank these objectives as far as complexity?  Are these objectives in the cognitive, affective or psychomotor domains?

I also was really intrigued by the misunderstandings about behavioral objectives that Borich (2011) describes in this chapter.  I will have to keep my eyes open for those common misunderstandings.

 

References

Borich, G. D. (2011) . Effective teaching methods: Research-based practice. (7th ed.).  Allyn & Bacon.

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Comments

  • tskennedy  On July 31, 2011 at 6:10 pm

    I like that you included examples of what you are thinking about implementing in the classroom as you read these chapters. I find that I am constantly getting sidetracked thinking about how I can use key concepts. There is definitely value in this. I also was interested by the misunderstandings about behavioral objectives, definitely seem good to look out for.

  • amyvaughn  On August 8, 2011 at 4:49 am

    I love the use of the verb “attack” in your first sample objective! I’m pretty sure this is not on Bloom’s list, ha!

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